Online Heart Health Calculator – Predict your Heart Disease Risk for next 5 years

Scientists have developed an online heart health calculator that can help to calculate a person’s cardiovascular age and his risk of dying from cardiovascular disease.

According to the study conductors, the calculator can predict the likelihood if a person will be hospitalized or die from coronary artery disease in the coming 5 years.

The test takes into account factors which involve an individual’s risk of developing cardiovascular disease and having a heart older than their chronological age. The members of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research believe in its uniqueness because of the number of risk factors it considers.

The risk factors range from social status, demographics, air pollution exposure, smoking, alcohol consumption, educational background, and even the sense of belonging.

Users also need to detail their ethnicity, levels of stress, residence status, and whether they have diabetes and hypertension.

The paper detailing the features of Cardiovascular Disease Population Risk Tool (CVDPoRT) Was published in the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Heart disease is the leading causes of death all over the world. The most usual kind of cardiovascular disease is coronary heart disease (CAD), where plaque builds up in the arteries which supply the heart with blood.

But most people don’t know they have the signs of heart disease until they experience a potentially fatal heart attack or an episode of stroke.

To develop the test, the researchers assessed data on 104,219 Ontario residents, who took part in the Canadian Community Health Survey from the year 2001 to 2007. The age of the participants ranged from 20 to 105 years old.

The CVDPoRT is developed with the Canadian population in mind, nevertheless, it can be modified according to other ethnic groups.

Dr. Doug Manuel, a senior researcher at The Ottawa Hospital and head author of the research, said in an interview: “A lot of people are interested in healthy lifestyle, but often we don’t have that health talk in the doctor’s office. Physicians check your blood pressure and cholesterol levels, but they don’t always ask about risk factors that could cause a heart attack or a stroke.

“We hope this tool can assist the people — and their care team — with better information about healthy living and alternatives for reducing their risk of heart attack and stroke.”

9 Vital Questions to ask Your Cardiologist 

One in two human beings will have a heart attack or stroke. In fact, nearly twice as many adults die of cardiovascular disease than all forms of cancer. Find out if you are at high risk. Begin by asking your cardiologist these 9 important questions.

  1. What is coronary heart disease?
  2. Do I have any major risk factors?
  3. If I hold a positive family history of heart attack, am I at greater risk?
  4. What is my blood pressure, cholesterol, level, body mass index and blood sugar level?
  5. If I smoke, what is the best means for me to quit?
  6. How much physical activity should I be doing?
  7. What is a heart-healthy diet plan for me?
  8. What are the warning signals of a heart attack?Are they any different for adult females and elderly?
  9. What screening or diagnostic tests for heart disease do I require?

Drinking One Beer a Day may Reduce the Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke

Consuming a glass of beer a day may prevent future cardiovascular events, according to a new research.

Researchers said average liquor consumption slows down the body’s natural loss of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). HDL cholesterol levels, commonly referred to as a good form of cholesterol, eliminates dangerous cholesterol from the body and decreases a person’s cardiovascular illness risk.

A research on over 80,000 Asian adults has revealed appealing results on this theory, but physicians have cautioned people that more research is needed before any concrete assumptions can be made.

So to be on the safer side, don’t start drinking a glass of beer every day just yet.

Pennsylvania State University scholars came up with the theory that men who consumed one to two alcohol-based drinks per day had a slow depletion in good cholesterol levels (HDL), in comparison to those who didn’t consume.

The Same rule applied to women who consume a little quantity of alcohol daily, according to The Telegraph.

While the outcomes were pretty analogous regardless of whether the research’s individuals consumed beer or spirits,but scientists did observe that beer and not spirits had the biggest and more beneficial effect.

In reaction to the research’s results, Dr Nitin Shori, director at the Pharmacy2U online physician service, said: “While undetermined, this research seems to point out that there may be some health advantages in consuming little alcohol when it comes to lowering the risk of cardiovascular diseases or stroke. But further research is required before any concrete results can be attracted.”

Alcohol is one of the biggest risks associated with the style of living that leads to illness and loss of life, after obesity and smoking.The newest NHS guidance is that there is a safe level of liquor intake and neither women nor men should consume more than 14 units (1 unit=15 ml) of liquor weekly.

Dr Webberley Sally, the devoted GP for Oxford Online Drugstore, said: “There are so many inconsistent research results being released daily and with that, it is difficult to tell which health advice is misleading and which is not”

We do know that booze is bad for the liver to function properly and it aids to obesity, it can adversely affect sleep and psychological wellness, it has been connected to cancer along with lots of other illnesses such as cirrhosis and hepatitis.

Contrarily, other research results recommend that average booze can have some health advantages and there’s no question that a lot of people like to use such justifications to warrant their activities when reaching for a glass.

“The key is in the moderation message. Because too much consumption of liquor can certainly have a detrimental effect on the well-being of a person.”