3 Tips to Create a Heart Healthy Workplace – Infographic

Heart health just isn’t about one factor. Take exercise, for example. You can workout every day of the week, but unless you also eat well, your heart may not be able to reap the full benefits of that sweat time. And the same with eating: If you rely on lean meat and salads and fruit, that’s great. But without a strong muscle (your heart), your body will be lacking.

And heart health doesn’t stop being a concern for certain hours of the day. While what you do at home for your heart health is important, what you do while you’re at work is important, too. If you’re completely sedentary at work, that impacts your heart. If you indulge in donuts and sugary drinks at work, that works against your heart health. If you experience severe stress at work, that impacts your heart too. What else should you be concerned about for your heart health at work? This graphic explains it.

Keep Your Heart Healthy at the Office

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Insufficient Sleep Makes an Unhealthy Heart

Insufficient sleep can leave you feeling grumpy and agitated and will ruin your mood for the rest of the day.

Over a longer period of time, sleep deprivation can lead to serious health issues like obesity, diabetes, slower metabolism and inflammation.

A prolonged lack of sleep acts as a catalyst in disrupting basic health conditions which has detrimental effects on your health.

Shortage of sleep in the long run can shorten life expectancy too. Studies show that people who get a good night’s sleep live longer than those who don’t.

This further strengthens the argument in favor of getting the required amount of sleep every day.

In fact, physicians might even just recommend a good nights’ sleep to resolve and prevent possible health issues.

Optimal Sleep

According to a study by Harvard Med, the optimal sleep required differs for everyone, depending on their age and genetics. But on an average 6-8 hours of sleep in a day are optimal for the body to function at its best. Less than 6 hours of sleep increases the risk of heart disease.

When the body is resting, different enzymes and chemicals are activated, which calm it down from the intense activity that it undertook throughout the day. During this rest, the blood pressure and heart rate drop, and the body start rejuvenating.

Insufficient Sleep and Your Heart

Less than 6 hours of sleep prevents the heart rate from dropping and keeps it elevated for a prolonged period. This lack of variability means the hearts’ work remains the same, causing hypertension.

The further validation comes from studies about sleep apnea. It’s a condition which causes troubled breathing which wakes people frequently and disrupts their sleep cycle, causing sleep deprivation and fatigue.

According to the American Heart Association, sleep apnea is a contributor to increased risk of elevated blood pressure, arrhythmia, stroke and congestive heart failure.

Lack of sleep also disrupts metabolism, creating an imbalance in blood sugar levels, in turn, heightening the risk for diabetes. Shorter sleep cycles hinder the production of hormones which function to decrease appetite, triggering an increased consumption of calories. This increases the chance of high cholesterol and obesity which are known causes of multiple heart diseases.

How Can You Sleep Better?

According to the CDC (Centre for Disease Control and Prevention), 1 in 3 adults suffer from sleep deprivation; leading cause being a more hectic and busy lifestyle.

There are many ways which can help in getting a good night’s sleep, and some of them are;

  1. Exercise This tires out the body, improves the chemical balances and allows for more restful sleep.
  2. Lower the intake of alcohol and caffeine-laden beverages in the evening.
  3. Avoid a heavy, rich meal right before you go to sleep.
  4. And establish a fixed routine right before you sleep to trigger easy sleeping in future.

The most important tip is to get checked by a physician to make sure you have no underlying conditions that are causing the improper sleep cycle.

Not having sufficient sleep and rest in one day can have an adverse impact on not only the heart but overall physical and mental health. Recognizing and solving issues regarding your sleep early can save you distress later.

Can Prolonged stress cause heart disease?


‘Stress’ is a complex subject to define. I would like to define stress as ‘an environmental challenge to which an organism reacts’. In the subject of biology, we often talk about heat stress, cold stress and chemical stressors of various kinds. I think it is a mistake when we think of stress on a personal level and ignore the sheer biology involved in stress responses.

The complexity of the neuro-psycho-endo-and immunological responses to stress makes it very challenging to give a clear response to the above-stated question. It’s like asking ‘what does long-term sun exposure does to the skin?’ – The answers would fill many encyclopedic volumes and still be incomplete. However, there are several types of heart diseases that are proven to have connections to stress.

It is well demonstrated that a combination of an activated sympathetic nervous system and consequent hormonal cascades result in ‘stunning’ of the heart muscles. Stunning is a form of acute cardiac failure. The myocardium is not damaged per se but the compromise of cardiorespiratory function can still have fatal consequences. Hence, many researchers have projected this condition as proof that it is possible to ‘die from a broken heart’ in both a literal and figurative sense simultaneously.