Cardiovascular Diseases in Young Women

Cardiovascular diseases or in the common mans’ language, heart diseases are commonly associated with older people. But according to cardiologists, young people suffer from heart diseases more than people realize. More specifically heart problems were associated with older men more than women. But a study in 1984 determined that women suffered and died because of cardiovascular problems more often than men.

To spread more awareness, on February 3rd women all around America don red apparel to commemorate the National Wear Red Day. The American Heart Association has marked this day to raise awareness for the diseases which claim the lives of 500,000 women each year around the world. Cardiovascular diseases are still to this day, the number one cause of death in women of all ages. Although older women are more likely to develop a heart dysfunction, 15,000 young women under the age of 50 die from them.

Many young women, who believe in the misconception stated above, tend to ignore the right actions which help prevent heart diseases. Although there is much more awareness now because of survivors, like Rosie O’Donnell, speaking up about their experiences many young women still remain unaware. This becomes a problem when this unawareness leads to them ignoring signs of heart diseases.

According to a survey done by cardiologists at the American Heart Association, women tend to be unaware of the symptoms when they are having a heart attack and ignore it thinking it might be indigestion or heartburn. This may be due to the fact that many women experience different symptoms than men. If you are unaware and seem to experience any of the following symptoms than you might need a heart specialist immediately:

· Pain in Shoulder or Neck

Like many others who experience excruciating pain in their chest, young women especially with no prior health conditions experience pain in the neck, left arm and shoulder rather than the chest. Few women who suffered reported that they did not even experience extreme pain, instead they experience only discomfort. In the case of extreme discomfort get immediate attention from a heart specialist.

· Shortness of Breath

While shortness of breath might be associated with being winded, intense shortness of breath might be an indicator of an incoming heart attack. An extreme shortness of breath indicates a heart issue when it is accompanied with chest pains. Get a cardiologist to investigate if you are experiencing this symptom.

· Fatigue

Although a little bit of fatigue after a long day is very normal, extended experiences of fatigue can be a sign of insufficient amount of oxygen on your blood, which is an indicator of a heart disease.

· Racing Heartbeat

A racing heartbeat is normal after rigorous exercise which eventually subsides in a few minutes. In younger women specially a fast heartbeat without any heavy exercise is abnormal and shouldn’t be ignored.

Indigestion, dizziness, nausea and constant sweating might also be indicators of an under lying heart condition needing urgent attention. And if any of the symptoms go ignored, it may lead to a more complicated problem.

As per the saying prevention is cure, taking precaution is a smarter way to save you from any bigger issues later on in life. Especially when routines are more hectic and there is more stress, a yearly check up with a cardiologists very important. Whether or not you are experiencing one or more symptoms, getting a full work up from a heart expert will rule out any possible heart disease and save you any distress later.

Heart Stents are not always Beneficial for treating Stable Angina (Chest Pain)

New findings in the field of cardiovascular research can transform patient care, a latest study proposes that the placebo effect of stents in heart disease patients with chest pain may be far more pronounced than thought.
That could mean that drug treatment alone, rather than the expensive, artery-opening cardiac stents, is all that’s required for most of the patients, the researchers said.
“The primary reason for considering a stent placement is to unblock the culprit artery that is causing a life-threatening heart attack. However, stents are also placed into patients who complain of chest pain on physical exertion caused by narrowed arteries of the heart. It’s the second group of patients that we studied,” explained lead author Rasha Al-Lamee, from National Heart and Lung Institute and Imperial College London.”
The researchers recruited 200 patients with stable angina who underwent six weeks of intense drug treatment for their angina. After that, they either received a stent or underwent a simulated procedure where no stent was inserted. The subjects who received stents did not show improvements in chest pain and quality of life compared to those who did not receive a stent.
Angina is the medical term for chest pain. It is typically caused by the build-up of fatty plaques in the coronary vessels. Stents aren’t cheap, either: The stent and its insertion costs from $11,000 to $41,000.
The study was published on the world wide web in The Lancet medical journal, to coincide with a presentation at a cardiology meet in Denver. Al -Lamee stated in a press release that “Surprisingly, even though the stents helped in increasing the blood supply to the affected part of the heart, however, they did not provide any relief of symptoms compared to previous drug treatments, at least in this patient group,”.
“While these conclusions are compelling and deserve more consideration. however, they do not suggest that patients should never undergo the [stent] placement for stable chest pain. There are several patients who opt to have an invasive procedure overtaking long-term medication to control the symptoms of chest pain,” she added.
The physicians plan to analyze their data further, to determine if there is a group of subjects whose chest pain improves after stenting.
“It seems that the connection between opening a blocked coronary artery and improving symptoms is not as simple as everyone had thought,” Al-Lamee said. “This is a unique trial of its kind, and [it] will help us to develop a better perception of stable angina, a symptom that affects so many of our patients every day.”
Writing in a commentary, concluding the report, a cardiologist stated the “landmark” study has implications that “are profound and far-reaching.” “First and foremost, the consequences of [the study] show that there are no benefits” for the use of stents compared to drug therapy for patients who are suffering from stable angina, said Dr. David Brown, of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and Dr. Rita Redberg, of the University of California, San Francisco.
In fact, based on the latest findings, Brown and Redberg believe that stents may not be useful in most of the case scenarios even when a patient’s angina fails to get better with medications.
“Based on this data, all cardiology guidelines should be updated to minimize the recommendation for [stents] in patients with stable angina,” whether or not they also received conventional drug therapy, the doctors said.
According to Brown and Redberg, every year over a half-million patients in Europe and united states undergo stent procedure — and a minority of these patients experience potentially serious complications that can include heart attack, stroke, kidney injury and even death. It is irresponsible to Subject these patients to undue risks when no benefit can be achieved.
The editorialists concluded that physicians need to put more emphasis on drug therapy and efforts at improving the lifestyle of many heart patients — things like bad diets, lack of activity and smoking.