How does Potassium Rich Diet Lowers the Blood Pressure?

potassium hypertension

Foods that are rich in potassium are important in controlling high blood pressure or hypertension because potassium diminishes the effects of sodium in the body. The more potassium you eat, the more sodium is excreted in urine. Potassium also aids to decrease the tension in the walls of stiff blood vessels, which helps further to lower the blood pressure.

Supplementing potassium through daily diet is suggested for adults with blood pressure above 120/80 mmHg who are otherwise healthy. But be aware Potassium can be dangerous for patients with chronic kidney disease, it is a condition that affects the ability of the body to handle potassium. People who take prescription medications should also consult their physician before supplementing potassium to their diet.

The prescribed potassium consumption for an average adult is 4,700 milligrams (mg) per day. Many of the elements of the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet — fruits, fresh vegetables, dairy products and fish — are rich and natural sources of potassium. For example, a medium-sized banana has about 400 mg of potassium and half a cup of mashed sweet potatoes has 470 mg.

Here is a list of other potassium-rich foods include:

• Apricot Juice or Whole Apricots
• Honeydew melon and Cantaloupe
• Avocados
• Milk and Other Dairy Products
• Fat-free yogurt
• Grapefruit or Grapefruit juice (Grapefruit Juice can interact with cholesterol Lowering Drugs)
• Green Vegetables
• Halibut
• Lima beans
• Molasses
• Mushrooms
• Orange Juice and Whole Oranges
• Potatoes
• Peas
• Prunes
• Dates and Raisins
• Spinach
• Tomatoes
• Tuna Fish
Potassium-rich diet is one of the components of the Blood pressure lowering plan. Even though potassium can balance out the blood pressure-raising effects of sodium, eating more potassium should be combined with your efforts to get rid of that excess salt in your meals and develop other heart-healthy eating and lifestyle habits.

Is it possible to have high levels of potassium?

Excess potassium can be harmful to people with kidney disorders. As weak kidneys are unable able to remove excess potassium from the blood, and because of this, too much potassium may build up in the body.

Often, like hypertension, there are not many symptoms of high potassium levels in the blood (hyperkalemia). A person with high levels of potassium in the blood can have pain abdomen, weak or irregular pulse and can even faint in some instances.

One should always consult with a healthcare professional before buying any over-the-counter potassium supplement. You should also ask your cardiologist before trying any salt substitutes, Such substitutes can raise potassium in people with certain health conditions as discussed above.

Top Foods and Supplements for Reversing High Blood Pressure [Video]

Today I will be sharing with you, supplements and foods for treating high blood pressure. Blood pressure can be easily balanced out if you follow the steps mentioned below. High blood pressure is usually caused by excess consumption of sodium, everyday stress, poor nutrition and lack of exercise.

There are three particular nutrients you want to get in your food if you have high blood pressure:
1. Potassium
2. Antioxidants
3. Omega-3 fatty acids
4. Magnesium
Foods you should avoid :
1. Excess of sodium
2. Processed sugar
The best supplements to naturally treat high blood pressure:
1. Fish oil
2. Coenzyme Q 10
3. Magnesium
4. Garlic
Essential oils to use are:
1. Lavender essential oil
Lastly, a person suffering from high blood pressure should exercise 20-30 minutes, three times per week. By following these suggestions, you will be on the right path to naturally lower your blood pressure. For more information on blood pressure, you can check out the following video by Dr. Josh Axe.

The Grape Truth: Is Red Wine Beneficial For Your Heart?

The talk about red wine being good for your heart has been going about amongst wine enthusiasts for a few years. There is a high possibility that you might hear someone top off their glass with more wine while saying, “don’t worry, it’s good for my heart anyway!”

It is true that red wine may contain antioxidants and other compounds which might do wonders for your mood and lower your stress. There are studies that suggest that red wine, in moderate quantities, may be beneficial for your coronary artery health, but the link is still not understood and confirmed.

So how did the theory that red wine is good for the heart, get its hype? When you ask this question to a supporter of the theory, they will point out the French Paradox to you.

The French Paradox

The French paradox, a term coined during the 1980s, refers to the perception that red wine consumption may explain why the French population has lower rates of heart disease, despite their daily intake of a rich, fatty diet.

The theory gave scientists and researchers a spur to dig deeper and find if this could be true. Multiple studies led to the discovery of polyphenols, which are plant compounds. Found in red and purple grapes, and as well as other vegetables and fruits, these compounds are beneficial for cardiovascular health. More specifically, a polyphenol called Resveratrol was found in red wine, which is advertised as being an anti-aging compound which also prevents heart diseases.

Research in mice showed that Resveratrol might have compelling benefits for the heart, but there is still no evidence of it having the same benefits for humans. In fact, if humans wanted to recreate the beneficial effects of Resveratrol from red wine, they would have to consume around thousand glasses each day. Further, a study in Italy of adults whose diets were already rich in Resveratrol showed no significant link between it and heart disease rates.

So where does this leave the initial theory of red wine being good for health?

Studies and Observations

Well, according to these studies and more, there is no strong evidence that proves the theory and suggests consumption of red wine. Cardiologists and researchers have made the arguments that the studies which show that people, who consume moderate amounts of red wine, have lower rates of heart disease are merely observational. According to them, these studies are only able to explain an association between the two, but no real evidence of cause and effect.

According to an article in the Circulation journal, there are even some studies which do not suggest that wine may be beneficial for your heart health than other type liquors and beer. If this were true, then Japanese people would have higher rates of cardiovascular disease. But the reality is on the contrary; heart disease rates in the Japanese population are even lower than of the French, yet they consume high amounts of beer, sake and other hard spirits.

According to the inclusive results of various studies, the French paradox does not seem to be so paradoxical. Experts now believe that lifestyle habits and healthy dietary routines may explain good heart health better than red wine consumption. Another factor that berates the French paradox is a possible underreporting of cardiovascular diseases by the French doctors.

What is the Grape Truth?

The conclusion of the comparative studies and a long-held discussion among cardiologists turns out to be indecisive. With no cogent evidence supporting the theory of red wine is beneficial for heart diseases, it remains baseless.

Regardless, wine is a milder alcoholic beverage and more suitable than other hard liquors, but that does not mean it should be consumed in large quantities. There is a fine line between drinking wine as a healthy habit and overdoing it. Overindulgence can actually be harmful to your body, affecting your liver, brain, heart and immune system. Cardiologists suggest a measured amount of wine consumption i.e. about 5 ounces per day or less along with a healthy diet.

Vegetarian and Mediterranean Diets: Both Equally Beneficial for Cardiovascular Health

Diet and nutrition have been long proven to be an important factor that changes the condition of cardiovascular health. Different kinds of diets require consumption of various foods that alter the health of your body. For a long time, the Mediterranean diets have been hailed as the healthiest eating style for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. The diet requires regular consumption of fresh produce, nuts, olive oil, whole grains and lean meat. While cutting down on the use of fatty red meat, sugars, and processed foods. The elimination of processed food makes the diet automatically a better way of life for the people suffering from heart conditions.

However, a new study published in the Circulation journal concluded in showing that a vegetarian or more specifically, a Lacto-Ovo vegetarian diet, to be equally as beneficial for maintaining cardiovascular health as a Mediterranean diet.

The study was conducted by four Italian researchers from University of Florence and Careggi University Hospital, to observe how both diets compare to each other in terms of influencing heart health. The researchers recruited 118 clinically healthy adults between the ages of 18-75, with low-to-moderate cardiovascular risk profiles.

Half of the group was directed to follow a traditional Mediterranean diet, while the other half started a Lacto-ovo vegetarian diet, which required the elimination of all kinds of meat and fish, but included dairy and eggs. Each group followed the diet for three months.

The study was a cross-over comparison study, which meant that the participants switched to the other diets for another 3 months after the following the first one. During the study participants were regularly counseled and advised on the diets they were following.

This included detailed meal plans and a list of foods to include and exclude. During both phases of the study, the participants were screened regularly. For both diets, the researchers advised participants to consume 50-55 percent of their calories from carbohydrates, 20-30 percent from fats and 15-20 percent from lean protein.

The findings of the study showed that participants on both diets had lost 4 pounds overall. Also, both the diets were capable of significantly improving the overall cardiovascular health of the participants.

The results of the study are not as shocking because both diets overlapped in many areas, requiring consumption of the same food groups. Both diets allowed the consumption of dairy, eggs, whole grains, produce and nuts; only eliminating meat and fish products.

The vegetarian diet was observed to be significantly more effective in reducing the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) i.e. the bad cholesterol that accelerates plaque buildup in arteries. The Mediterranean diet however reduced triglycerides that increase the risk of heart attack and stroke.

The researchers concluded the study with a statement from Professor Francesco Sofi (M.D., Ph.D.) who said that “the take-home message from our study is that a low-calorie Lacto-ovo vegetarian diet can help reduce cardiovascular risk about the same as a low-calorie Mediterranean diet.”

The team of the researchers suggests that, even though the study has provided persuasive evidence regarding dietary patterns and cardiovascular health, there is a need for more studies. These studies should study and compare how these two diets affect the cardiovascular risk in patients with a higher heart disease. This would help physicians in the future to better guide their patients about maintaining a healthy lifestyle that benefits their cardiovascular health.